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Odd spaces and new media

Raza Rumi talks to artist Faisal Anwar, whose work plays with space and time in the digital era
Faisal Anwar is a renowned interactive, new media artist/producer based in Canada. He is a graduate of the Canadian Film Centre’s Habitat-LAB and was earlier trained in graphic design at Lahore’s National College of Arts. Anwar’s art practice […]

October 11th, 2016|Arts & Culture, media, Published in The Friday Times|0 Comments

Portfolio: Local yet global

Recently, Aicon Gallery in York exhibited Monomania — the first solo US exhibition of Karachi-based artist Adeel uz Zafar. The title of the exhibition summed up the themes that the works encapsulate. Monomania presents a commentary on the shades of insanity where thoughts focus on a specific cluster of subjects; the excessive enthusiasm for a […]

October 8th, 2016|Arts & Culture, Pakistani Art|0 Comments

Time Perception – BBC World

Mike Williams asks why some weeks just fly by but sometimes minutes can seem like hours? Why do we perceive time differently in different circumstances? Mike talks to Pakistani writer and broadcaster Raza Rumi, Claudia Hammond, author of “Time Warped”, David Eagleman, a neuroscientist at the Baylor College of Medicine at Houston and […]

May 15th, 2016|Arts & Culture, Pakistan|6 Comments

On Sir Syed Ahmad Khan

C.M. Naim’s, A Professor Emiretus had shared this some months ago:

“What an extraordinary man he was. Iftikhar Alam Sahib has been publishing books about him — about his little known aspects, the kind of things that our buqrat in Urdu departments never think to write about and our social scientists have never bothered to discover.
The […]

My interview with Ithaca Times, U.S.

Recently I was interviewed by Ithaca Times, USA. Here is the text:

The Ithaca Times sat down with Rumi to talk about his work—in past, present, and future—the state of Pakistan, and his impressions of the United States so far.
Ithaca Times:You took an unorthodox path into journalism. Tell us a little bit about your background […]

April 4th, 2016|Arts & Culture, Pakistan, terrorism|7 Comments

A message from Nizamudddin Dargah

I have never met Marta but the attachment to Nizamuddin Dargah has bound us for years. Yesterday I got this email and beautiful photographs from Marta Irene. Marta herself suffered a major accident in recent years and survived.
Human connections… RR




March 27th, 2016|Arts & Culture, Sufism, Sufism and Sufi poetry|0 Comments

Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy’s, Badge of honour

Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy’s Badge of honour incisive documentary helps reignite the debate on honour killings in Pakistan.

Second success: Sharmeen with her Oscar. Photo: Reuters Second success: Sharmeen with her Oscar. Photo: Reuters

Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy has won the second Oscar for a short documentary that brings international attention to an endemic evil in Pakistan (and India for that matter) known as honour killings. Officially, there are a thousand victims of honour killings every year but the actual number may be much higher. Aside from Sharmeen’s recognition by Hollywood, which by itself is a big win, the Oscar for A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness is a victory for Pakistan’s long list of activists who have been advocating to end this heinous practice. Days before the Oscars ceremony, a special screening of the movie was held at Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s house. The Pakistan PM issued a statement saying he would bring changes to the legislation to end the curse of honour killings. Sharif’s recent overtures to causes such as minority rights and talking about a liberal Pakistan have come as a surprise, given his conservative politics, and his party’s attempts to prevent progressive legislation during the 1990s. Or it is a sign of Pakistan’s drift into extremism that even centrist politicians like Sharif are worried about the future of the country.